April 9, 2016

Lately I have been obsessed with getting to work on time.  If I’m late I might not have a place to sit.  There are always a few latecomers lugging their laptops down to Starbucks to set up shop for the day and I don’t want to be one of them.  I tried working from home – some people (slackers?) seem to love it, but not me.  My home life and my work life start to become one seamless parade with work edging out home until it seems like that’s all I do.  I started going in to the office again, joining the flow of humanity on the TTC, earlier and earlier, 7:30, 7:20, 7:15…And then I remembered:  Looking at Art in Toronto.

Trinity Square Video – Heather Phillipson

Trinity Square Video’s new location is not optimal for viewing.  Skylights wash out the projected video images.  (I was advised they are fixing the problem and custom blinds are on order.)  Fortunately, the inaugural exhibition of the space features work by Heather Phillipson, and the  show, titled “sub-fusc love-feast,” has such a powerful audio component that the diminished visual impact is hardly missed.

 

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Installation view of sub-fusc love-feast by Heather Phillipson

Also, three video projection screens are tucked into an elaborate installation of cut out photographs.  It’s like walking around in an oversized collage, cut out from cheerful travel postcards and National Geographic magazines.

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Installation views of sub-fusc love-feast by Heather Phillipson

The layers of sound and music, dominated by a bell-like female voice, are completely absorbing.  Heather Phillipson is a thinker and a poet.  She takes on the slippery task of defining nature in this era of unrestrained production and gives voice to the places, things and animals caught in the terrifying cycles of consumption.

The piece has a plaintive, uncertain feel to it, the sound in particular grows panicky at times and fearful.  This makes sense given the subject matter.  Heather Phillipson explores the grim news that is easier to deny than accept; the scale and finality of the environmental crisis that looms over us all.

 

Gallery 44 – Sarah Anne Johnson

The victim of a medical experiment, perpetrated without the consent or knowledge of patients, Sarah Ann Johnson’s grandmother suffered crippling depression and agoraphobia following her treatment.  Sarah Anne Johnson explores this trauma, which continues to ripple through generations of her family, in a video installation called The Kitchen.

 

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Still from The Kitchen by Sarah Anne Johnson

On numerous monitors we watch short loops of a woman, alone, on a kind of stage set which is a kitchen.  The clothes and decor signify the nineteen fifties.  She wears a dress and heels but everything else is wrong.  This woman is strangely afflicted, nuts probably.  A mask is warn on the back of her head and a wig obscures her face.  She carries out her lonely kitchen activities backwards, freakish, awkward, perpetually failing, occasionally crying out in frustration, hurling plates in this filthy kitchen where she seems to be trapped.

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Still from The Kitchen by Sarah Anne Johnson

It’s fascinating to watch the intense and torturous contortions the woman performs to carry out simple tasks as our vision flips back and forth, trying to make sense of the impossible.  And maybe that is what Sarah Anne Johnson is getting at: the misery of trying to succeed in an situation which is impossible.

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Still from The Kitchen by Sarah Anne Johnson

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Still from The Kitchen by Sarah Anne Johnson

In a separate room, a projected video in black and white, shows the same woman.  She is still in the kitchen.  Now she lies on the floor, trundling heavily in an abstract, compulsive manner.

In acting out these moments in the kitchen Sarah Anne Johnson may be re-creating childhood memories or simply seeking to understand her family and herself.  The art work she comes up with has a strange tragic aspect to it, dark and painful.

Author: ssnbrttn

This blog is all about looking at art in Toronto now.

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